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Iniva, the Institute of International Visual Arts, creates exhibitions, publications, multimedia, education and research projects engaging with new ideas and emerging debates in the contemporary visual arts which reflect the diversity of contemporary society. Visit their website  Image: Continuing the Conversation, Iniva 2008

Event date
Tuesday, December 3, 2013 - 08:15
Location
London

Petrona Morrison, The transnational Caribbean: Construct or reality?

The transnational Caribbean: Construct or reality? Transnationalism, as a product and process of globalization, has been articulated as a theoretical frame within which cultural production can be located, within and outside of the Caribbean. The reality of the economic, cultural and social impact of globalization is without dispute, and can be seen daily in the manifestations of popular culture in the Caribbean, reflecting some degree of hybridity and creolisation.

Event date
Wednesday, December 4, 2013 - 08:15
Location
London

Glenda Heyliger, Artist - Aruba "Artworks"

Event date
Tuesday, December 3, 2013 - 08:15
Location
London

Day one roundtable: Global movement and art practice

This is the roundtable discussion titled 'Global movement and art practice', which took place on day one of the conference, it followed panels on 'Creativity and Community', 'Networks on Contemporary Art', 'Art Practice and Exchange'. It was chaired by Tessa Jackson.

Event date
Wednesday, December 4, 2013 - 08:15
Location
London

Charles Campbell, Creative Contingencies

Charles Campbell will examine the notion of sustainable artistic production through the lens of his own practice. Looking specifically at his Transporter Project, Campbell explores the various contingencies as play in its making. Begun partly in response to a conference on human trafficking, the Transporter Project pulls together numerous threads from Campbell’s wider art practice, which looks at the interplay between heavily loaded political narratives and utopian ideals, painting, sculpture and performance, and personal and public spaces.

Event date
Wednesday, December 4, 2013 - 08:15
Location
London

Charl Landvreugd, Notes on continental Afro-European aesthetics and sensibilities

Notes on continental Afro-European aesthetics and sensibilities The idea of a separate category for continental aesthetics and sensibilities among Afro-European subjects is fairly new in contrast to other diaspora aesthetics. Developing this concept in the visual arts is helped by using tools from English and French-speaking discourses; at the same time, however, such tools need careful consideration before being applied because of differences within the regions of Europe.

Event date
Tuesday, December 3, 2013 - 08:15
Location
London

Annalee Davis, Beyond economic vulnerability: How can we move towards healthy cultural eco-systems?

Beyond economic vulnerability: How can we move towards healthy cultural eco-systems?

Event date
Wednesday, December 4, 2013 - 08:45
Location
London

Alessio Antoniolli, Director - Triangle Network

Event date
Tuesday, December 3, 2013 - 08:45
Location
Rivington Place, London

Second Conference

This is the second conference for the ‘Sustainable Art Communities: Creativity and Policy in the Transnational Caribbean’ project, which is taking place at the Institute for International Visual Arts (Iniva, London) on 3rd and 4th December, 2013. ‘Sustainable Art Communities’ is a two-year international research project led by Dr Leon Wainwright (The Open University, UK), with Co-Investigator Professor Dr Kitty Zijlmans (Leiden University), funded by the Netherlands Organisation for Scientific Research (NWO) and the Arts and Humanities Research Council (AHRC, UK).

Event date
Wednesday, May 2, 2012 - 17:30
Location
inIVA, Rivington Place, London EC2A 3BA

Timed out is a pioneering study of modern and contemporary art in the aftermath of empire. It addresses the current ‘global turn’ in the study of art by way of the transnational Caribbean, offering an in-depth account of its integral role in histories of art in the Atlantic world. The book looks at why art of the Anglophone Caribbean and its diaspora has been placed not only ‘outside’ but ‘behind’ more familiar and dominant art canons, and how the politics of space and time can be engaged in new ways to rethink the global geography of art.

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