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Tate Modern

Tate Modern holds the national collection of British art from 1500 to the present day, and international modern and contemporary art. Based in the former Bankside Power Station in London, it is currently the most-visited modern art gallery in the world.  Visit their website  Image: Tate Modern, First floor of the Tate Modern, Nathan Rupert, flickr

Event date
Saturday, June 24, 2006 - 12:00

Kathe Kollwitz and Frida Kahlo, The Guerrilla Girls  We're feminist masked avengers in the tradition of anonymous do-gooders like Robin Hood, Wonder Woman and Batman. How do we expose sexism, racism and corruption in politics, art, film and pop culture? With facts, humour and outrageous visuals. Our work has been passed around the world by our tireless supporters. We've appeared at over 90 universities and museums in recent years, as well as in The New York Times, The New Yorker, Bitch, Mother Jones and Artforum; on NPR, the BBC and CBC; and in many art and feminist texts.

Event date
Saturday, June 24, 2006 - 12:00

Marko Daniel and Frances Morris, Tate Modern - A Case Study  This paper reviews the controversial opening display of the permanent collection at Tate Modern which embraced a thematic, as opposed to chronological structure, as well as the principle of rotating displays. It discusses the recent rehang of the collection which departs from the opening display in significant ways while it also continues to address the same challenges and builds on and develops a number of its principles.

Event date
Saturday, June 24, 2006 - 12:00

Nigel Warburton, Juxtapositions  Art galleries select and display material objects, typically unique works, in specific locations. Viewers experience these, consciously absorbing curators' interpretations from descriptions and captions, often forearmed with preconceptions about what they are seeing. Particular juxtapositions affect the viewer in a range of ways many of them semi- or pre-conscious. Philosopher Nigel Warburton considers some of the issues raised by juxtaposition using examples from the recent Tate Modern re-hang.

Event date
Saturday, June 24, 2006 - 12:00

Steve Edwards, Displaying Modern Art  Steve Edwards introduces the Open University programme 'Displaying Modern Art', which was made for the course AA318: Art of the Twentieth Century. This programme focuses on the previous displays at Tate Modern and features interviews with Tate curators as well as some of their critics. By showing the previous displays at Tate Modern this session will provide a basis for informed discussion of the current arrangement of the collection. Further Reading Contemporary Cultures of Display, edited by Emma Barker, Yale U.P. 1999

Event date
Saturday, June 24, 2006 - 12:00

Marko Daniel, Introduction  At this study day leading curators and art historians discuss the relationship between exhibitions, museum collections and art history.

Event date
Saturday, March 17, 2007 - 13:00

Gill Perry, Discussion  This video recording is the discussion, the final part of the Tate Modern study day Identity and Performativity

Event date
Saturday, March 17, 2007 - 13:00

Gavin Butt, Just a Camp laugh? David Hoyle's 'Magazine'  In this presentation Gavin Butt considers the place of the sincere speech act within the discourse of contemporary politics and performance. He is particularly concerned to highlight the ways in which such forms of speech may often 'misfire', either as we fail to believe in them or as they leave us cold.

Event date
Saturday, March 17, 2007 - 13:00

Lara Perry, The substance of the subject: representing identity in contemporary portraiture  Many of the starkest examples of 'performed' gender in contemporary art have been delivered through the genre of portraiture: the works of Cindy Sherman and Yasumasa Morimura can certainly be understood to work in this context.

Event date
Saturday, March 17, 2007 - 13:00

Gilda Williams, Factory Girls and Superstars: Warhol's Women in the 1960s  Gilda Williams discusses the construction of women's identity in Warhol's Factory, which, despite being often described as a 'boy's club’, counted numerous fascinating, often beautiful women among its regulars, including Jane Holzer, Edie Sedgwick, Brigid Berlin, Ultra Violet, Dorothy Dean, Mary Woronov, Viva and innumerable others.

Event date
Saturday, March 17, 2007 - 13:00

Gill Perry, Gender, Performance and Play: An Introduction  Professor Gill Perry reviews some of the issues for the day, exploring the relationship between gender, performativity and play. This programme maps out the wide range of practices and theories associated with the labels 'performance', 'performance art' and 'performativity', providing a toolkit with which to explore some of the practices involved.

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