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Tate Modern

Tate Modern holds the national collection of British art from 1500 to the present day, and international modern and contemporary art. Based in the former Bankside Power Station in London, it is currently the most-visited modern art gallery in the world.  Visit their website  Image: Tate Modern, First floor of the Tate Modern, Nathan Rupert, flickr

Event date
Saturday, March 12, 2005 - 13:00

Paul Wood, Globalisation & Art - A Brief History  Paul Wood considers some historical precedents for the relation of western art to the art of the rest of the world. In particular, he talks about the early 20th century avant-gardist notion of 'the primitive' and the break-up of this idea in the later 20th century.

Event date
Saturday, March 12, 2005 - 13:00

Introduction. Topics explored in this study day include the changing history of modern western art’s relationship to the rest of the world; theories of globalisation; and the status of photography in relation to globalisation. One of the most important factors to affect contemporary art has been cultural and economic globalisation. Increasingly, international art exhibitions draw their contents from all over the world, and artists address a wide range of subjects relating to this developing situation.

Event date
Saturday, June 25, 2005 - 12:00

Melanie Manchot, Kathy Battista, Gill Perry, Gavin Butt, Dorothy Rowe and Catherine Grant, Discussion 8  A discussion between Gavin Butt, Dorothy Rowe and Catherine Grant along with questions from the audience.

Event date
Saturday, June 25, 2005 - 12:00

Catherine Grant, Baby Butches and Reluctant Lolitas: Performances of Adolescence  Collier Schorr and Hellen van Meene are contemporary photographers who are both known for their seductive, glossy portraits of adolescent girls, coming to prominence in the 1990s with a number of other women photographers who focus on the adolescent in their photography. Their portraits play with traditional voyeuristic modes of looking, with the older female photographer taking the place of the voyeuristic male and the model taking the place of 'Lolita'.

Event date
Saturday, June 25, 2005 - 12:00

Dorothy Rowe, Wigs of Wonderment: Performing Race and Gender in the work of moti roti  Wigs of Wonderment, a performance piece by Keith Khan's live art group, moti roti, is a self-declared 'investigation of issues around race and gender, as manifest in hair and beauty' where the experience of beauty is performed as a 'sensory journey' for and by its performer-participants.

Event date
Saturday, June 25, 2005 - 12:00

Gavin Butt, You Cannot Be Serious!: Gender Performance and Queer Authenticity  Performance has often been approached as a sign of non-serious or value-less activity in the 20th and 21st century. For instance, in speaking pejoratively of someone as 'theatrical', we can see how performance is sometimes associated with a lack of authenticity, in this case by implying that they are exaggerated or affected, 'too much' to be taken seriously.

Event date
Saturday, June 25, 2005 - 12:00

Melanie Manchot, Kathy Battista and Gill Perry, Discussion 1  A discussion between Gill Perry, Melanie Manchot and Kathy Battista along with questions from the audience.

Event date
Saturday, June 25, 2005 - 12:00

Melanie Manchot, Artist's Presentation  Melanie Manchot will talk through a selection of recent works in relation to a performative approach to photography and portraiture. She will discuss her use of cameras, both moving and still, as tools to create encounters on the threshold between staged and documentary practice. Many of these works are made with strangers, often in public spaces, and aim to articulate relationships between the individual and collective space.

Event date
Saturday, June 25, 2005 - 12:00

Kathy Battista, Women Artists, Pain and Self-Portraiture  Kathy Battista explores how women artists have used pain (both physical and emotional) as a medium. She considers three historical moments: Frida Kahlo’s works from the 1940s including Without Hope, 1945, Tree of Hope, Keep Firm, 1946, and The Broken Column, 1944; feminist artists Hannah Wilke and Jo Spence’s work from the late 1980s and early 1990s including Intra Venus (Wilke) 1993 and Narratives of Dis-ease (Spence) 1989; and Tracey Emin’s work from the late 1990s.

Event date
Saturday, June 25, 2005 - 12:00

Gill Perry, Introduction to the Themes of the Day  Germaine Greer has described Kahlo as 'the first ever true performance artist'. Gill Perry considers this claim in relation to recent debates about the meanings of performance art, and in comparison with the activities of a later generation of women artists, including the work of Carolee Schneemann, Ana Mendieta and Hannah Wilke from the 1960s and 70s.

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