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Tate Modern

Tate Modern holds the national collection of British art from 1500 to the present day, and international modern and contemporary art. Based in the former Bankside Power Station in London, it is currently the most-visited modern art gallery in the world.  Visit their website  Image: Tate Modern, First floor of the Tate Modern, Nathan Rupert, flickr

Event date
Saturday, March 27, 2004 - 13:00

Sophie Howarth, To the Things Themselves! Phenomenology and Minimal Art  This talk explores ideas of the readymade in American and European art since the 1960s. Beginning with a discussion of the historical origins of 'readymade' sculpture in the 1910s, Sophie Howarth goes on to explore the renewal of interest in such practice in the late 1950s, and its appeal to generations of artists since. Among those whose work will be discussed are Jasper Johns, Robert Morris, Piero Manzoni, Bruce Nauman, Charles Ray, Sherrie Levine and Jeff Koons.

Event date
Saturday, March 27, 2004 - 13:00

Sophie Howarth, Paul Wood, Matthew Gale, Dominic Willsdon, Discussion 1

Event date
Saturday, March 27, 2004 - 13:00

Dominic Willsdon, To the Things Themselves! Phenomenology and Minimal Art  Phenomenology is a school of thought founded by the philosopher Edmund Husserl in the early 20th century. Between the 1920s and the 1960s, Martin Heidegger, Jean-Paul Sartre, Maurice Merleau-Ponty and others developed and expanded phenomenology to address art, literature, society and politics.

Event date
Saturday, March 27, 2004 - 13:00

Matthew Gale, Carving out a Reputation  Brancusi has a reputation as a skillful peasant camping in the milieu of Montparnasse modernism. Purity and innocence are habitually used to describe both the artist and his work. However, it is clear that this can be traced back to the complex myth that Brancusi constructed for himself. Matthew Gale, curator of Tate Modern's exhibition Brancusi: The Essence of Things, considers some of the questions of validity that accumulated around Brancusi's work, as it generated controversies around the world, and how the sculptor came to embody ideas of authenticity.

Event date
Saturday, March 27, 2004 - 13:00

Paul Wood, Expanding Concepts of Sculpture  For most of the twentieth century, sculpture seemed to be the poor relation of modernist art compared to painting. After the crisis of modernism in the late 1960s this changed, as painting lost its position at the centre of contemporary art to be replaced by a multiplicity of three-dimensional practices. Paul Wood starts the day with a brief overview of some aspects of the modernist theory of sculpture leading up to the challenge to it in the sixties.

Event date
Saturday, March 27, 2004 - 13:00

Sophie Howarth, Introduction  This study day explores the various art practices that have been described as sculpture during the modern period, with particular reference to their avant-garde and aesthetic status. The talks consider the way in which the category of sculpture has been reworked or challenged through concepts such as the 'readymade' as well as through performance and installation art and site-specific commissions.

Event date
Saturday, October 5, 2002 - 12:00

Sophie Howarth, Phyllida Barlow, Paul Wood, Mark Godfrey, Jonathan Jones, Jason Gaiger and Jane Burton, Discussion 2  From Russian Suprematism through Abstract Expressionism, Minimalism and beyond, abstraction has been variously interpreted as nihilistic, political, sublime, decorative and ironic. While much writing about abstract art has been opaque, the talks here aim to clearly open up a variety of theoretical models for discussion.

Event date
Saturday, October 5, 2002 - 12:00

Jonathan Jones, Abstraction and the Media  Speaker: Jonathan Jones, Guardian writer.Abstract art is the opposite of what you might call a good news story, argues journalist Jonathan Jones. Good stories are precise, they have characters, they can be told quickly. None of which abstraction delivers.

Event date
Saturday, October 5, 2002 - 12:00

Jane Burton, Experience and Interpretation  Speaker: Jane Burton, Curator of Interpretation, Tate Modern.Taking the Barnett Newman exhibition as its focus, Jane Burton seeks to unravel some of the possible interpretative approaches to Newman's art adopted by museums, both in his lifetime and today.

Event date
Saturday, October 5, 2002 - 12:00

Jason Gaiger, Barnett Newman and the Evocation of the Sublime  Speaker: Jason Gaiger, Lecturer in Art History at The Open University.In an important essay, 'The Sublime is Now', written in 1948, Barnett Newman rejected the search for beauty in favour of 'man's natural desire for the exalted, for a concern with our relation to the absolute emotions'.

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